Every sight has a story to tell

Alai Minar: The victory tower of Alauddin Khilji | Qutub Minar, Delhi

The ambitious Alauddin Khilji of the Khilji dynasty earned fame through his ruthless methods. And just like any other king, he wanted to leave behind a lasting legacy. A minar taller and grander than the Qutub Minar in Delhi. The ruins of Alai Minar seen today tell us a different story. This story explores why a king known to ravage kingdoms in whole could not finish the tower of his dreams.

The Alai Minar at the UNESCO World Heritage site of Qutub Minar complex in Delhi has stood unfinished for over 700 years. What’s its story? This video takes you back in history to the time of Alauddin Khilji, the ambitious and ruthless king of Delhi Sultanate who built this tower. 

Alai Darwaza, Ornate doorway to Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque, built by Alauddin Khilji in 1311CE..Photo credit Alimallick CC BY SA 3.0

Chor Minar Photo byVarun Shiv Kapur CC by SA 2.0

Photo by Ad0312 CC by SA 4.0

Siri Fort wall and Tohfe Wala Gumbad dome Public Domain

Chor Minar or the Tower of Thieves. Photo by Ramesh Ialwani, CC by SA 3.0

View of Tohfe Wala Masjid in Siri Fort area near Shahpur Jat village. Photo by Nvvchar, CC by SA 3.0

Ruins of Siri Fort wall, New Delhi, India-20090517 Nvvchar CC by SA 3.0

Alai minar Photo by Vineegautam987 SA 3.0

Mounted warriors pursue enemies. Illustration of Rashid-ad-Din’s Gami’ at-tawarih. Tabriz 1st quarter of 14th century Public Domain

Portrait of Sultan ‘Ala-ud-Din, Padshah of Delhi credit MetMuseum Public Domain

END OF STORY

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