Every sight has a story to tell

Unravelling the Mysteries of the Red Fort, Delhi

The story of the Red Fory is linked intimately with the rise and fall of the Mughal empire. Storytrails brings you this podcast which explores the Red Fort complex with Anisha Shekar Mukherjee, a conservation architect who will share her knowledge of this grand monument.

Was the Red Fort really red when it was first built? Just how long did Shah Jahan live here? What was life like for the royal ladies in the fort?

And what makes the monument so special?

Welcome to the Storytrails podcast. In this episode, we explore the Red Fort complex with Anisha Shekar Mukherji, a conservation architect who will share her knowledge of this grand monument. Hop on as we explore the citadel of Power in India, The Red Fort in Delhi.


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